Liberal Studies Program > First-Year Program > Course Descriptions > Discover Chicago

Discover Chicago

Autumn 2018
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LSP110

Alternative Cultures: Artists' Books & Zines

Heather McShane, Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse

Inherent to artists’ books and zines is their accessibility. Artists' books are essentially books that are art, and they can be distributed more widely than other art forms; zines (abbreviated from "magazines" or "fanzines") are short, self-published works, historically photocopied. By nature, these types of publications allow for diverse voices and divergent interests outside of mainstream media, outside of advertising's purview. In this course, we will gain historical perspective by reading The Century of Artists' Books by Johanna Drucker and Notes from the Underground: Zines and the Politics of Alternative Culture by Stephen Duncombe. We will handle and peruse old and contemporary artists' books and zines—many created by Chicagoans—at Joan Flasch Artists’ Book Collection (one of the largest such libraries in the world open to the public, with more than ten thousand artists' publications); Center for Book, Paper, and Print; Quimby’s Bookstore; and even DePaul's own Richardson Library. Local book- and zine-makers will visit our class to discuss their practices and show us techniques. As a final project, you will make our own artist's book or zine.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Animals & Humans in Chicago

Connie Johnston, Geography

Despite popular conceptions that human life defines urban areas, cities always have been and are home to myriad forms of animal life interacting directly and indirectly with humans. Chicago, in particular, owes much of its historical development to its rise in the 19th century as the main US livestock processing center. In the present day, the city is home to a world-class zoo and aquarium, has been ranked in the top-10 as “dog-friendly,” experienced a dramatic uptick in resident complaints about rats in 2016, and has numerous residents who rent egg-laying hens over the summer months. In this course we will explore several contexts of human-animal relations in the city, visiting key sites such as the Lincoln Park Zoo and a local animal shelter, and hearing from individuals involved in animal-related activities such as wildlife rehabilitation and feral cat utilization for rat control. Students will learn about Chicago’s “animal history” and how this history shaped the city of today, and also the multiplicity of ways in which human and animal lives continue to intersect here in the present. In addition, by visiting sites and hearing from experts, students will develop in-depth knowledge of several areas that impact, among other things, the city’s economy, legislation, natural environment, and social interactions.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Careers in the Arts & Culture

Tim Mazurek, Office of Academic Advising Services

This course will include Chicago organizations and professionals assisting first year students in becoming more aquatinted with the careers associated with arts and cultural institutions. These fields include: Arts Management, Arts Marketing, Development and Fund Raising, the work of individual artists, designers, producers, directors, Arts Administrators, Gallery Managers, Curators and the role of the non-profit arts organizations. The field work aspect of this course will allow students to visit organizations in these fields to observe workplace environments. This will afford a look at not only the missions and organizational structures of these institutions but at the diversity of staff and programming as well as the trends in the industry. With arguably some of the finest art collections, performers, theaters and musicians in the world, Chicago is at the center of the cultural landscape. Come and Discover Chicago as we explore the sites and sounds of: the Chicago Art Institute, Museum of Contemporary Art, the Mexican Fine Arts Center, neighborhood galleries, jazz music, folk art and local theater.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago & Jazz

Joe Cunniff, School for New Learning

Jazz is live improvisation, pulsing rhythms, terrific personal expression. Chicago owns a special place in the history of jazz from its early days right up to today. Chicago has given birth to, developed, and presented towering people and performances in jazz, and continues to do so. In this class, through great recordings and films, we’ll learn jazz from a Chicago perspective plus see and hear a live jazz performance at a famous Chicago jazz club.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago by the Numbers

Jen Sweet, Office of Teaching, Learning & Assessment

People commonly mistake numbers as representing objective truth. From politics to the media, people have their own motivations for providing numbers that support their own narratives. However, as educated citizens, it is our job to understand numbers in a more nuanced way. This class will challenge students to think critically about what numbers tell us, their limitations, how they can be used to deceive, and the ethical issues that arise when we use numbers. By visiting a diverse group of organizations, such as museums, for profit and non-profit organizations, universities, and government agencies, students will explore Chicago from a numerical perspective.

The Chicago Cubs

Blair Banwart, Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse

Five years ago, if you were asked what comes to mind when you think of Chicago’s north side baseball team, you might’ve mentioned the green ivy, the bleachers, and a blue W on a white flag. You might’ve also mentioned lovable losers, Bartman, and an extremely vindictive goat. Today, the ivy and bleachers are still there. But the W flies more frequently. And Bartman has been forgiven, the goat’s curse has been squashed, and the term lovable losers no longer applies—all because a certain team in 2016 ended a 108-year drought and won the World Series. So how did this happen? In this course, we’ll not only examine the Cubs’ transformation, but we’ll take a look at the history of the Cubs franchise; we’ll learn more about Wrigley Field and how its presence in Wrigleyville impacts local residents and businesses; we’ll examine what it means to be a Cubs fan; and we will, of course, attend a game. So put on your caps, bring along your lucky talismans, and we’ll find out if this year will be (again!) THE year.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago in Sound

James Scheidhauer, Physics

From ringing bells in Mitchell Tower in Hyde Park to listening to recorded silence in the Lincoln Park Conservatory we will discover the wide variety of sounds Chicago has to offer. We will use this rich diversity of sound as our springboard to achieve a fuller picture of our Chicago community and begin to think about the city from both a historical as well as a scientific perspective. We will think about how our creation of sounds and music has evolved from pre-historic times to the present day. We will ask how sound technology has influenced human activity as well as an urban environment like Chicago. For example, how does the invention of the telephone make skyscrapers possible?
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago Politics: Past & Present

John French, Political Science

The city of Chicago is known for its colorful political history. Once the fastest-growing city in the world and a hub of water and rail transportation, Chicago was a place where there were money and power to be had, and the competition for them could get rough. At the best of times, governing Chicago was not a job for the faint of heart. This course will examine the political history of Chicago. We will think about how political leaders and institutions have shaped the city we see today—and vice versa. We will focus on four main themes: Urban Planning & Economic Development; Race & Immigration; Transportation & Infrastructure; and Local Government & Democracy.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago: A Global City

Mallory Warner, International Studies

Chicago is often described as a “City of Neighborhoods.” This course counteracts that common-sense description with the argument that Chicago is instead a global city. We can say that Chicago is a global city in the sense that it is a cultural, financial, entrepreneurial, political powerhouse. This course will focus on how the outsider shaped Chicago and how Chicago is able to shape the world. Thus, while getting to know the city and campus are major foci of Explore Chicago, we will also be looking at the social and political history of Chicago in order to understand what being “global” means to the city today. Between readings, films, and outings, we will explore the internationally groundbreaking phenomenon that is Chicago. We will learn about the individual narratives of the people who have built this city and how you, as an outsider to DePaul (or maybe to Chicago or the United States) are able to leave your mark on the city.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago: Many Cities, Many Stories

Dan Stolar, English

It’s tempting to think of a metropolis as huge as Chicago as a monolith—a single, huge enormity—but we all know that there are really many Chicagos, sometimes changing character entirely from one block to the next and each of these characters has its own story. In this course, we will discover how various Chicago story-tellers have made their little slices of Chicago come alive in their work, and we will discover some of these neighborhoods for ourselves. We will look at some of Chicago’s most famous literature, stories that famously characterize Chicago and we will look at more recent attempts to tell different Chicago stories. Throughout we will pay attention how Chicago’s stories embody the social issues of the city.
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Chicago's Public Art & Murals

Bro. ​Mark Elder, Art, Media & Design

Chicago’s Public Art and Murals will give you, the student, a look at the whole of Chicago. Much of what makes Chicago and what the people of Chicago feel as their values, can be seen in its Art. The student will tour Chicago’s neighborhoods and take on the values and issues that reflect the people of the various neighborhoods. The student will also get a chance to design a mural in reflection, mainly to show what they saw as valuable in their journey in and around the city.

Chicago's Spoken Word Performers

Stephanie Howell, Communication

This class is designed as an introduction to Chicago’s exciting spoken word performance scene. You will attend spoken works/word performances representing a variety of styles, cultures, and venues. By studying the stylistic and cultural diversity of Chicago’s spoken works/word community, students will learn more about the rich community life of DePaul and the city at large.

Chicago's Urban Agriculture

Hugh Bartling, Public Policy Studies

The words “farm” and “city” are often thought of in opposition. Cities are sites of industry and consumption whereas farming is an activity associated with rural environments. The traditional dichotomy between the city and the farm, however, is not so straightforward. There has always been agricultural production within Chicago’s boundaries since the city’s 19th-century incorporation. Furthermore, processes of agricultural production occurring outside the city’s boundaries have had a dramatic impact on urban development inside Chicago. One of Chicago’s most famous literary figures, Carl Sandburg, famously invoked this idea of urban-rural integration in his ode to the city, describing Chicago as the “hog butcher for the world” and a “stacker of wheat.” This course explores this urban/rural ambiguity throughout Chicago’s history by looking at these two basic themes: the conduct of agriculture within the city and its immediate environs; and the city as a conduit for agricultural processing, distribution, and trade—activities that shaped its social and physical landscape. We also examine the city’s burgeoning financial sector—in particular the development of the commodities markets—and recent attempts to integrate farming as part of community efforts to make Chicago more sustainable, to live up to the city’s motto, urbs in horto, a city in a garden.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Death & the City

Benjamin Frazer-Simser, Philosophy

In this course, students will be introduced to an often neglected, but extremely important, group within their urban community—the Dead. In Chicago, as in every human community, we live with our dead: we share our urban space with them, our customs, rituals, and laws regulate how they should be treated and where they can reside, they participate in our lives through individual memory and commun​al monument, from statues to street names, and they appear in our art, literature, and architecture. During Immersion Week, we will explore our urban geography for sites where our contemporary attitudes toward the Dead and Death (and, thus, the Living and Life) come to light: the museum, the cemetery, the morgue, and the mortuary. And we will study comparatively the different attitudes toward Death among some of the different peoples, cultures, races, and classes that make up our urban community in Chicago.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Digital Cinema in Chicago

Liliane Calfee, Computing & Digital Media

Digital Cinema in Chicago exposes students to the world of digital cinema production. Students are introduced to the production of feature films, commercials, television shows, animation, and gaming. Students see what goes on behind the scenes and meet the individuals that create these works of art. Students visit movie sets, production studios, post-production and animation houses, and computer gaming companies. By the end of the class, students have a better understanding of what goes into the creation of the various forms of digital cinema. The course combines classroom lectures and discussions with field experiences.

Discover Your Inner Vincent

Siobhan O'Donoghue, University Ministry

This course will help students identify and explore their unique gifts in service of the common good. Taking our interior lives as a starting point, the course will gradually move into an exploration of the Vincentian legacy in Chicago today. What makes an education at DePaul University unique? What is the gift of the Vincentian family in Chicago? How are students called to be part of this living legacy? Immersion sites will focus on nature, houses of worship, Vincentian and Daughter of Charity social service agencies, art, architecture, and relationships with those on the margins. The topics studied will be directly related to the Immersion Week sites through articles, books, films and guest speakers.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Discovering Vincentian Ways of Leadership

Karl Nass, University Ministry

This course will introduce students to Vincentian leadership theory and practice. Students will examine the Vincentian values that inform the socially responsible and ethical leadership framework called Vincentians in Action (VIA). Through site visit experiences and service-learning engagement at designated community-based organizations that serve a marginalized population, students will learn about the diversity and community-specific resources of Chicago from DePaul alumni and community partners who are Vincentian leaders. Students will explore what can be learned about themselves as reflective practitioners and spiritual human beings when engaging in this experiential learning process. Through the class discussions, DePaul alumni and Vincentian speakers, assigned readings, and writing assignments, students will reflect on their own beliefs and perceptions regarding socially responsible and ethical leadership. In doing so, students will analyze the implications of this specific way of Vincentian leadership in terms of reducing poverty and implementing systemic change in our society today.
  • Open only to DePaul Leadership Scholars.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Drawing History: Chicago as Subject & Muse

Steven Carrelli, Art, Media & Design

In this course, students will explore the city of Chicago through creative drawing and research. We will become familiar with a variety of locations in the the city through a combination of site visits, readings and discussions. We will draw on site to get to know the places as they currently are, research their histories to learn about their past identities, and encounter them through the works of contemporary and historic artists in order to see how they have inspired works of art in the past. Students' on-site drawings, readings, discussions and independent research will become the source material for a prolonged studio project, a portrait of a place, which will be a drawing-based work of visual art that explores the history and identity of a specific place of the student's choosing within the city of Chicago. The course does not assume prior formal study in drawing, but students should have the desire to immerse themselves in drawing and explore it enthusiastically. The definition of drawing done in this course will be broad and inclusive of a wide variety of techniques and approaches, and experimentation with materials and processes will be encouraged. The course will include instruction in the basics of observational drawing as well as a variety of contemporary and nontraditional practices. Students will be introduced to the work of a variety of artists both historic and contemporary, and they will meet several contemporary Chicago artists whose works explore place and history.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Dying to Understand: Loss & the City

Leah Bryant, Communication

The purpose of this course is to examine the different types of loss that we are likely to experience throughout our lives. The types of loss that may be addressed in this course include: the death of a loved one (e.g., family member, pet), the loss of a relationship (e.g., divorce, breakups), and the loss of identity (e.g., traumatic life events, transition to adulthood). From a life course perspective, this course will examine beliefs and spirituality, loss legacies, healing, and resilience. Immersion Week will consist of trips to various Chicago institutions that may include museums, cemeteries, a funeral home, an animal shelter, sites of famous deaths, and other locations around the city that offer a unique perspective on loss in society.

Environmental History of Chicago

Shawn Bailey, Environmental Science & Studies

“Let ’er go!” With those words, in 1900, the City of Chicago completed one of the greatest engineering feats in human history—the reversal of the Chicago River. After decades of industrial pollution ruined the city’s drinking water supply and threatened the future of Chicago, city leaders hatched an audacious plan, to break through a nearby continental divide and completely reshape Chicago’s watershed. And it worked! Today, Chicago, the third most populous city in the United States, is a product of its environment—“nature’s metropolis” according to environmental historian William Cronon. Environmental history, described as “one of the most vital” and “fastest growing” fields in American history, examines the intersection of human action and the natural world, and tells stories like that of the reversal of the Chicago River.

Here we go! During Immersion Week, we will explore Chicago’s exciting environment.  Activities will include canoeing on the Chicago River, hiking the elevated 606 Trail, exploring Northerly Island, and taking a “toxic tour” of the Little Village neighborhood.​
  • ​Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors

Environmental Justice: The Politics of Garbage

Naomi Steinberg, Religious Studies

Using the Chicago metropolitan area as our laboratory, we will track the disparity between communities of lower economic status and affluent neighborhoods through an environmental justice lens.  Why are residents of lower income housing exposed to waste facilities that put their health at risk?  Why are the needs of these residents and their communities neglected by the city?  Why do wealthy residents have the privilege of choosing to live away from these disposal sites when lower income families lack residential mobility?  In addition to site visits during Immersion Week, course readings will analyze how waste is managed by the city, which segments of the population benefit from the city’s policies, and who pays the price.​
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

The French Connection

Pascale Kichler, Modern Languages

In this class you will learn about Chicago’s “French connection,” the city’s many ties to French history and culture. We will travel to socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods across Chicago, always stopping along the way to enjoy good food. Our visits will make you discover how much France has helped shape Chicago. You will learn about the city’s foundation as Fort Chicago by French explorers in the seventeenth century and its permanent settlement by Jean Baptiste Point du Sable. We will examine how France served as the city’s cultural model in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century (e.g., for art collectors like Bertha Potter Palmer and urban planners like Burnham). We will explore France’s continuing cultural influence nowadays with the impact of French cu​isine and visits to eateries. Since St. Vincent de Paul was French, we will visit Vincentian social services to see how they are empowering underprivileged communities to built a better future. Finally, we will meet with different guests, including the French Consul General and Business France Director to discuss what we have observed and learned from our visits and readings.

While no knowledge of French is required, if you are planning to take this Discover Chicago course, now could be the perfect opportunity to learn French or to develop your existing French skills by taking a concurrent French language class -- beginning, intermediate or advanced -- depending on past experience or results of the language placement test. For more information, contact Corban Sanchez at csanch12@depaul.edu​.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

German Chicago

Eugene Sampson, Modern Languages

German-speaking immigrants to Chicago arrived during a time of intense industrialization and growth within the city, helping to make much of what we recognize as Chicago today while shaping its labor movement through radical politics. But Germany’s status as an enemy in two world wars resulted in a backlash against German immigrants and their descendants in the US, causing the German presence in Chicago to be virtually effaced. This course investigates the various and significant contributions made by Chicago’s German community, the palpable traces that group has left, while delving into more contemporary aspects of a German presence in Chicago, which range from revolutions in architecture and cutting edge visual arts to a healthy business community. Our site visits will take us from Lincoln Square, Chicago’s German neighborhood, to landmark architectural sites in the Loop and elsewhere and into the Art Institute of Chicago, the crown jewel of Chicago’s art scene. And along the way we'll find time for stops in quieter places where Chicago’s German heritage remains undisturbed.

While no knowledge of German is required, if you are planning to take this Discover Chicago course, now could be the perfect opportunity to learn German or to develop your existing German skills by taking a concurrent German language class -- beginning, intermediate or advanced -- depending on past experience or results of the language placement test. For more information, contact Corban Sanchez at csanch12@depaul.edu​.

The Gigatour: Finding the City's Underbelly

Richard Lee, Philosophy

We will discover Chicago on the Gigatour. That is to say, we will study the City of Chicago with a view to its manner of supplying the necessities of life. Water, air, food, warmth, transportation, communication, leisure and entertainment — these are just a few of the things a city needs to supply its population. For a city and (sub)urban area of eight million people, the task is daunting. We will begin by studying the Burnham Plan for the City of Chicago, and the Wacker Manual, and we will travel to sites such as: the Eisenhower Expressway, Illinois Institute of Technology, Oak Street Beach, the Stockyards, the Farmer’s Market at Daley Plaza, Lincoln Park Zoo, the Chicago Board of Trade, the City Recycling Center, Graceland Cemetery, and the Field Museum. Students will write journal entries for each of our visitations on the Gigatour — so named because of the gigabytes it contains and they will study maps, transportations, plans and other such keys to the City.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Global Catholicism in Story & Stone

Scott Moringiello, Catholic Studies

​This course studies immigrant Catholicism in Chicago through history, theology, sociology, art and architecture. We will visit ethnic Catholic parishes in Chicago—Irish, African-American, Chinese, Polish, Mexican, and more—meet interesting people, have some good ethnic food, and see some stunning churches and art. Throughout the course, we will study the various groups of Catholic immigrants who have made Chicago, and found a home away from home in the Catholic Church. At the same time, we will address larger questions about the Catholic Church, a community of 1.3 billion people that is simultaneously global and local. The Church is found in every part of the world, but the Church adapts to each local culture: a Catholic Mass in Kenya can be very different from a Catholic Mass in Poland. How does a local church be true to its local culture without excluding those from other cultures? How does the Catholic Church maintain both unity and diversity? This course uses the city of Chicago as a workshop to examine these questions.

Health & Food Justice

Judith Singleton, First-Year Program

This course introduces students to exploring and examining food and food ways in the city of Chicago. We will focus on the historical, social, cultural, political, economic and biological perspectives of food in neighborhoods in Chicago as a way of learning about inequality. Health & Food Justice in Chicago places emphasis on health and place; and its relation to food and food justice. Using site visits, strategically selected readings and course discussions, we will explore questions concerning food, food movements and waste in the urban landscape and neighborhoods in Chicago. The course is organized in two parts: the industrial and the organic. Central questions of the course include: What does it mean to eat a healthy diet? What kinds of access to food are present in various Chicago communities and how does it relate to the historical, social, political and economic contexts? What is a food desert? What is waste? What are some of the politics surrounding food and waste in Chicago? What are the resources available in each neighborhood we visit to keep residents healthy or unhealthy?
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

International Chicago

Erik Tillman, Political Science

In this course, we explore different aspects of Chicago's role as a leading international city. Topics we will cover include: representation of foreign governments in Chicago, Chicago as a center of international trade and tourism, immigration and multiculturalism in Chicago, foreign students in Chicago, foreign policy analysis and bureaucracies in Chicago, the activities of local groups in international issues, the coverage of foreign news in the local media, and the efforts of the City of Chicago’s government to promote its standing as an international city. We will take several field trips to visit relevant and interesting locales, and we will have occasional guest speakers as well.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Irish & Irish Catholics in Chicago

Mary McCain, Catholic Studies

Every year, on or around March 17, Chicago residents and many, many visitors to the city watch as boats dye a portion of the Chicago River green for St. Patrick's Day. Everyone's Irish on St. Patrick's Day, or so the saying goes. But a century before this tradition began in the 1960s, Irish immigrants and Irish Chicagoans were blamed for everything from crime to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. Anti-Catholic prejudice combined with other forms of bigotry to hamper Irish lives in myriad ways through much of the 19th century. The Irish responded by focusing their energies on building their own institutions -- churches, schools, and what we'd think of today as social-service providers -- institutions that became remarkably successful and opened many different paths to success for Irish immigrants and their children. Many of these continue to serve Chicagoans of many ethnicities today. This course will examine the transformation of the Irish experience in Chicago, concentrating on the political and religious aspects of that experience but also looking at the preservation and transmission of Irish sport and culture,​ whose original bearers in the 19th century would be very surprised by the “cool factor” these activities and arts now enjoy. We will also become familiar with the challenges still faced today by those who come to Chicago from Ireland and do not start quickly on the legal path to U.S. citizenship.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Italian Chicago

Daniela Cavallero, Modern Languages

Chicago’s Italian immigrants began arriving in the 1850s, most of them poor, illiterate farmers and agricultural workers from the central and southern parts of Italy. Today in the Chicago area there are 300,000 Italian Americans of various generations. Economically and socially, they have entered the American mainstream and are solidly middle-class. How did Chicago affect who they became? How has their presence affected Chicago? What does it mean to be an Italian American in Chicago today? Finding the answers to these questions will be the subject of our course, as we explore the story of Chicago’s Italian-American community through written texts, interviews, films, oral histories and field trips to neighborhoods and cultural institutions. Our reading material will draw on a variety of ethnographic, historical, sociological, journalistic and literary texts. These texts will serve as a background for our study of the oral histories of Italians collected at the University of Illinois.

While no knowledge of Italian is required, if you are planning to take this Discover Chicago course, now could be the perfect opportunity to learn Italian or to develop your existing Italian skills by taking a concurrent Italian language class -- beginning, intermediate or advanced -- depending on past experience or results of the language placement test. For more information, contact Corban Sanchez at csanch12@depaul.edu​.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry

Justice in the City

Daniel Hanichak, Political Science

This course will give students an inside look at the Chicago criminal justice system by traveling throughout the city and taking first hand tours of our city’s courthouses, jails, police department, medical examiner’s office and forensic laboratory. In addition to experiencing first-hand how our system works, they will also hear from prominent speakers including experienced Police Officers, Prosecutors, Defense Attorneys and Judges who will be able to describe to them the “Chicago way.” Students will be able to evaluate their own experiences of the immersion week and what they learned from the guest speakers of how our modern justice system works and compare that to the past decades issues of race inequality, societal influence & corruption. Finally, students will use all of this information to identify the problems that still exist, and promote how Chicago’s citizens can continue to work towards making it a system that promotes justice for all people.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Latina/o Entrepreneurship in Chicago

Ester Trujillo, Latin American & Latino Studies

In this course we will analyze how Latin American migrants to Chicago have pursued entrepreneurial endeavors and established businesses that have become cornerstones of the city’s cultural and economic life. Immigration from Mexico, Latin America and the Caribbean to Chicago has created markets for products and services that allow Latina/o businesses to thrive. We will examine the urban geography of Latina/o business and pursue an anthropological analysis of the dynamics that allow Latina/o businesses to exist. Transnational flows of goods, money, and people indicate that the dynamics that shape immigrant businesses are part of a hemispheric economic process. Together, we will learn about the transnational economic policies that generate out-migration and the structures of immigrant labor and consumer markets in the U.S. Midwest. We will examine the foundations of ethnic entrepreneurship and specifically Latina/o-owned businesses in Chicago in order to better understand immigrant economic, social, and cultural integration into the city.

While no knowledge of Spanish is required, if you are planning to take this Discover Chicago course, now could be the perfect opportunity to learn Spanish or to develop your existing Spanish skills by taking a concurrent Spanish language class -- beginning, intermediate or advanced -- depending on past experience or results of the language placement test. For more information, contact Corban Sanchez at csanch12@depaul.edu​.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Latino Immigration to Chicago

Juan Mora-Torres, History

Latinos are the fastest growing ethnic minority in the United States and currently make up 16% of the population. Unlike other single group Latino communities around the country, Chicago has the most diverse Latino population in the United States. In addition to sizable Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Central American communities, there are smaller Latino communities from most Latin American countries. To best benefit from the rich cultural, political, and economic diversity of those communities, this course will explore the causes and effects of Latino immigration to the city through the eyes of the immigrants.

While no knowledge of Spanish is required, if you are planning to take this Discover Chicago course, now could be the perfect opportunity to learn Spanish or to develop your existing Spanish skills by taking a concurrent Spanish language class -- beginning, intermediate or advanced -- depending on past experience or results of the language placement test. For more information, contact Corban Sanchez at csanch12@depaul.edu​.
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Latino Language Communities in Chicago

Carolina Barrera-Tobón, Modern Languages

Chicago has always been a city of immigrants, one of the most linguistically diverse cities in the United States and the most segregated one. This course proposes to discover and explore Chicago by means of ethnographic studies of language and historical narratives. An ethnographic perspective requires attention to local-level, “insider” meanings that students will explore by a research process and by observing the communities themselves.

While no knowledge of Spanish is required, if you are planning to take this Discover Chicago course, now could be the perfect opportunity to learn Spanish or to develop your existing Spanish skills by taking a concurrent Spanish language class -- beginning, intermediate or advanced -- depending on past experience or results of the language placement test. For more information, contact Corban Sanchez at csanch12@depaul.edu​.
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Live from Chicago: Discovering Improv's Hometown

James Mourey, Marketing

Chicago is the world’s capital for improvisational comedy. Home to Second City, iO, ComedySportz, the Annoyance Theatre, and more, Chicago has been the training ground for some of the greatest performers – Tina Fey, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Amy Poehler, and many more. But beyond sitcom stars and feature film favorites, the fundamental skills of improvisation have infiltrated businesses and boardrooms around the world. But why has improvisational comedy made its home in Chicago? How did improv get its start in the city? And how has the art form been shaped by the richness of the diverse Chicago neighborhoods in which the comedy style has grown? Or, conversely, how have the improv institutions of Chicago shaped the neighborhoods they call home? In this course, students will discover and explore the unique relationship between Chicago and improvisational comedy, a relationship unlike any other between any major city and any other art form. Students will learn the tenets of improvisation, hone their comedic skills, visit integral training centers and neighborhoods that shaped improv, and witness firsthand how the skills and tools from improvisational comedy translate into real world, practical applications. After participating in this course, students will have an appreciation for the diversity and richness of Chicago’s neighborhoods and their populations through the lens of improvisational comedy. Additionally, students will acquire the skills and tools to help them shed their inhibitions, try new things, and appreciate the importance of simply saying, “Yes, and...” all skills that will help them navigate their college and post-college careers.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Love & Committed Relationships, Chicago Style

Adriane Stoner, Communication

The urban center that is Chicago goes by many names including “The Windy City,” “The Second City,” and “Chi-Town,” but perhaps more importantly to its population of more than two and a half million residents, Chicago is simply known as “home”—and as the saying goes, home is where the heart is. In this course students will explore the dynamics of love, committed relationships and other matters of the heart, Chicago style. On this journey students will experience first-hand several of the culturally unique and diverse neighborhoods in the city while simultaneously learning about the role that love and committed relationships play in the lives and communities of Chicago residents. Using a theoretical lens rooted in the principles of Relational Communication, students will examine the phenomenon of love in a wide range of contexts from romantic love, to familial love, to love and compassion for one’s community. Students will also study the lifecycle of interpersonal loving relationships including their initiation, development, maintenance and dissolution/termination, as well as reflect on the role that love has played in shaping their own sense of identity and connection.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

The Medieval City in Chicago

Karen Scott, Catholic Studies

What does it mean to call Chicago a “city”? For example, are cities vast networks of roads, buildings, and institutions? Sets of ethnic communities living side by side and interacting together? Are cities more like living and growing biological organisms, or more like sacred communities seeking God and beauty together? What makes Chicago a unique kind of city, and what makes it a city like other cities that have thrived over time and space? To answer these questions, this class will study some of the ways in which the urban spaces and life of modern Chicago are similar to, and different from those of​ cities that thrived during Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance in the Mediterranean world and Europe. We’ll explore some of the Chicago institutions and people that connect Chicago to the Middle Ages. And we'll visit sites in Chicago that give us information on urban spaces both today and in the Middle Ages: museums, churches, and libraries.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Natural Chicago by Bicycle

Randall Honold, Philosophy

We often think of the city as something separate and distinct from nature. Many believe that nature is something that exists “out there,” away and different from human culture or civilization. This course is based on the opposite premise, that nature is an integral part of the city of Chicago. We will visit parts of the city known for their distinctly natural character as well as places that we would not ordinarily think of as being natural. We will also examine the variety of work that takes place within Chicago to enhance urban nature and our relationship with it, and see how cities are made up of natural systems that affect and are affected by our culture. Throughout, we will reflect on our experiences to figure out what we mean by “nature” and “natural.” Our teaching team hopes you will develop a greater appreciation of the nature to be found in the city, a deeper understanding of how our behaviors affect nature, and a firmer grasp on the concept of the natural. On an important practical note: We will move around the city on bicycle! You will need to bring a bike in good working order. For acceptance into the class, students are REQUIRED to have a bicycle, bike lock and bike helmet for the field trips that take place during Immersion Week and the academic quarter.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Nature in the City

Sarah Richardson, Biological Sciences

Humans share the city of Chicago with many other species—not just our pets and the plants in our gardens, but also with wild plants and animals. A stop- light camera close to DePaul has recorded a coyote regularly crossing the large six-way intersection on the Northeastern edge of campus at night. The main topic of the course is urban ecology—the study of this wildlife and how it fits into an urban ecosystem. We will study what Chicago’s wild animals eat and how the wild plants create their own food; exactly where each of the species lives within the city; and how individuals of one species interact with members of different species—their friends and their foes. We will also consider interactions within species such as courtship, reproduction, parenting, group living and competition. A second theme will be how human Chicagoans relate to these organisms—how we view them and how they interact with us. We will discuss why some people have positive views of certain wild species and others view them negatively. For most of these species, there is a variety of opinions on how the urban population should be managed—we will investi- gate these options and discuss their merits. During immersion week, the class will take trips to various Chicago Parks to observe the city’s wildlife. On these field trips, plants and birds will often be the focus because we can observe them—mammals often are in hiding. There will be more of an emphasis on animals in the classroom and as subjects of the main assignment.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Nonviolent Chicago

Ken Butigan, Peace, Justice & Conflict Studies

What would Chicago look like if violence were not as stubbornly pervasive as it is? A growing number of organizations across the city are determined to find out – by building a culture of nonviolent options. In Chicago this potential nonviolent culture (where every person matters and where this respect, compassion, and commitment to the well-being of all can spark effective alternatives to personal, interpersonal, and structural violence) is potentially emerging piece by piece through the work of numerous Chicago organizations. These include the South Austin Coalition, Su Casa Catholic Worker, Voices for Creative Nonviolence, Interfaith Youth Core, Kairos Community, and American Friends Service Committee. This course will study and experience the work of these groups to illuminate what a nonviolent culture might look like and how a more “Nonviolent Chicago” could emerge through education, community-building, social movements, awareness campaigns, and nonviolent design, which this class will engage in methodically and creatively. This course begins with an Immersion Week, where we will visit and engage with the organizations across Chicago listed above.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Photographing Chicago

Jordan Schulman, Art, Media & Design

“Photographing Chicago” is designed to examine the city by venturing into its many diverse neighborhoods using the camera as a tool of observation and inquiry; to learn how other photographers have depicted the city; and to develop your own relationship to the city through the act of photographing it. Our subject will be the city itself and the many ways in which we observe it. First we will consider the observations of others who have come before us. We will be looking at how Chicago photographers have pictured the city by visiting their studios, looking at their photographs, and having the opportunity to ask questions about how and why they make their work. We will think about how neighborhoods are structured and how each of these neighborhoods has a distinctive history and architectural, social and cultural imprint. This we will do with our cameras in hand, asking questions and letting the images stand in for answers (and sometimes prompting further questions). You will be conducting research and writing short essays about various neighborhoods that will be included along with your photographs in the capstone project for the course, a neighborhood photo book. Although the use of a camera is required, no prior photographic experience is needed. Several site visits will be required, not all during class time.
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Photographing Chicago

Rachel Herman, First-Year Program

“Photographing Chicago” is designed to examine the city by venturing into its many diverse neighborhoods using the camera as a tool of observation and inquiry; to learn how other photographers have depicted the city; and to develop your own relationship to the city through the act of photographing it. Our subject will be the city itself and the many ways in which we observe it. First, we will consider the observations of others who have come before us. We will be looking at how Chicago photographers have pictured the city by visiting their studios, looking at their photographs, and having the opportunity to ask questions about how and why they make their work. We will think about how neighborhoods are structured and how each of these neighborhoods has a distinctive history and architectural, social, and cultural imprint. This we will do with our cameras in hand, asking questions and letting the images stand in for answers (and sometimes prompting further questions). You will conduct research and write about either an historical or contemporary Chicago photographer, reflect on the neighborhoods we visit, and make a neighborhood photo book. Although the use of a camera is required, no prior photographic experience is needed. Site visits will be required, not all during class time.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Printed Works in Chicago: Past & Present

Heather Easley, Sociology

The city of Chicago has long been a bastion of printed works, including newspapers, magazines, and books. The incredible growth of our city in the 1800s, fueled by manufacturing, economic, and political growth, influenced many of the iconic Chicago authors to write in ways that could depict the social, economic, and political conditions of the times. In the early 20th Century, Chicago emerged as a powerhouse of publishing, supporting authors who were not afraid to describe this disorienting new urban reality. Literary critics in London dubbed Chicago “The literary capital of the United States.” In this class, we will examine Chicago’s history with printed works, and explore our city’s current relationship with printed works. How does this past influence our present? What role does Chicago play in this time-tested method of communication? How do these individuals and companies, in a position of privilege, impact and promote issues of diversity, social responsibility and urban sustainability? Literacy is an issue of human dignity, and how does Chicago impact literacy among its residents? We will explore these questions, and our great city during this course. We will read books and articles written by Chicagoans, about Chicago, and published here as well. And we’ll look at the changed landscape of our city’s newspapers and publishing houses, as well as libraries and independent bookstores, and celebrate this culture surrounding words on paper.

Privilege in Chicago

Georgianna Torres Reyes, Office of Mission & Values

This course focuses on privilege as an essential and complex facet of social justice work. This broad concept encompasses the intersecting social statuses of such things as race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, class, and religion. Through this course students will demonstrate an understanding of how privilege, power, and oppression affect society at large and Chicago specifically. We will not cover these societal realities merely as abstract concepts, but rather as powerful entities that influence the lived experiences of all people. An important facet of this course will be students plotting their own social location. We will continually reinforce not only why a specific aspect of privilege is important to grasp, but also where we as individuals stand in relation to this privilege. The desired outcomes are twofold. First, students will be challenged to develop the cognitive abilities necessary to critical engage such topics. Second, they will confront how their own social status interplays with both privilege and oppression.

Queer Chicago

Johnny LaSalle, Office of Multicultural Student Success

Queer Chicago explores Chicago history, politics, activism, and community resources as they pertain to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, pansexual (LGBTQIA+) people and their allies. Through the lens of exploring Chicago’s LGBTQIA+ resources, students will gain a better understanding of gender, sexuality, sexual identity, politics and current issues and trends within LGBTQIA+ communities in Chicago and beyond.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Science & Nature Writing Chicago

Ted Anton, English

This course introduces students to the Chicago tradition in the fast-growing field of nature and science writing. Students will visit Chicago research venues such as the Illinois Medical District, the Adler Planetarium, and the Field Museum, as well as a local academic lab. They will meet with researchers and leading professionals in science and nature communications, tour a medical communications consultant, a public information office, and one fun natural venue in Lincoln Park. They will write one press release, one feature article and one short essay. Absolutely no previous science or health background necessary.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Science in the City

Mary Bridget Kustusch, Physics

The greater Chicago area is home to two national laboratories (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory), numerous museums with a wide range of science exhibits, and an incredible number of practicing scientists from throughout the world. Students in this course will have the opportunity for a full-day visit to Argonne, and will explore several of the city’s museums. The visits will give students insight into how and where current scientific research is done, provide opportunities to meet with scientists who are actively involved in forefront research, and offer a glimpse of the many ways that locals and visitors to Chicago learn about historic scientific findings through exhibitions. During the quarter, students will explore the ways in which scientific knowledge in various fields has evolved and will consider such questions as: How do discoveries in one scientific field impact the development of other fields? How is the evolution of science dependent on the characteristics of the scientists? What are the sources of funding for current scientific research? Does scientific work occur in unexpected places?
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Summer Sports in Chicago

Philip Meyers, Political Science

This course examines numerous areas of athletics that encompass the town’s ultra-competitive landscape. Whether it be Cubs and White Sox baseball, soccer, 16" softball, horse racing, the media or otherwise, this course captures everything sports related to the Windy City. For example: Do you know what might make one a Cubs or Sox fan? Or what goes into covering a sporting event or story as it gets presented to the Chicago public? Also, how ethical is gambling; and what are its effects on the city—even when such wagering is presented in a legal fashion? Those questions and more will be answered during the quarter as we take sports and see them in a new light, with a deeper meaning, as we consider how they affect Chicago’s people and culture. Whether our class is at a ballpark, playing beside legends from a sport this locale boasts as its own, or trying to convert a 7-10 split, each student will thoroughly enjoy and learn more than he or she could have ever thought about the Chicago sporting world.

Walking Chicago: A History in Footsteps

Jason Kalin, Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse

From the peripatetic philosophers of Ancient Greece to the streets of twenty- first century Chicago, the writer as walker has garnered special cultural significance and symbolism. But nowadays, walking is seen most often as a means to an end, not an end in itself. Or worse, as unnecessary to modern life, for walking has been replaced by planes, trains, and automobiles. We have become drivers and passengers that have forgotten how to walk—walking “as a cultural activity, as a pleasure, as an ancient and profound relationship between body, world, and imagination” (Rebecca Solnit, 2000). This course seeks to turn us into walkers and to return a rhetorical and aesthetic wonder to the act of walking. We will walk to write, composing “urban encounters” that combine the “joys of looking around” with “the deep pleasure of making connections” with the people and places of Chicago (Helen Liggett, 2003). By studying and practicing the art of walking, we will use the material of everyday life—the rhythms and experiences of the streets of Chicago, its people, places, and things—as construction material for our compositions. We will read about the history of walking alongside the history of Chicago to become urban explorers charting the changing people and landscapes of our city’s neighborhoods. Walking becomes a way of literally and figuratively writing ourselves into Chicago. Assignments will include a walking journal, a multimedia essay, and a multimedia map of Chicago to be collected into an atlas. By wandering Chicago with wonder, we will write Chicago as a relationship among body, world, and imagination.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I

Women's Leadership for Social Change

Joyana Dvorak, Office of Mission & Values

This course will introduce students to women’s leadership in Chicago and the living legacy of St. Louise de Marillac. Students will learn about the life of Louise de Marillac, a woman who radicalized the role of women in 17th century France by founding the Daughters of Charity with Vincent de Paul. Tracing historical moments such as Chicago’s great fire, settlement houses, racial injustices in the 1960s, and today, students will examine the leadership of the Daughters of Charity caring for those most in need. During immersion week, students will witness firsthand how Louise’s legacy continues in Chicago through social work, education, healthcare, child and elder care, women’s empowerment and spirituality. Through class discussions, speakers, readings, documentaries, and writing assignments students will analyze the implications of women’s leadership in transforming society and caring for the common good. Students will reflect on their own beliefs, values, gifts/talents and perceptions regarding women’s leadership to explore their role as socially responsible leaders in our world today.

Writing Chicago's Neighborhoods

Jennifer Ingersoll, Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse

First-year students have many questions about college and Chicago, or attending college in Chicago: What will I major in? How will college change me? How will I fit into this massive city, let alone navigate it? This course will explore answers to these questions via writing. Through visits to the Art Institute, Poetry Foundation, Chicago History Museum, several Chicago neighborhoods, and more, you’ll get a first look at the Second City’s history, politics, and culture. Become a docent, poet, editorialist, storyteller, food critic, and photojournalist—and discover a little more about yourself as you begin your journey at DePaul.
  • Schedule compatible with BIO 191 General Biology I for Science Majors
  • Schedule compatible with CHE 130 General Chemistry I